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Generations (pt.2)

Exploring a more responsible way to design and construct garments

Generations is an exploration of more sustainable ways to create garments. This second part of the project showcases the work I did in collaboration with menswear designer Bianca Saunders to develop a range of modular garments suitable for transformation.

The apparel industry is flawed

The apparel industry has an enormous social, cultural and environmental significance. With growing outputs and dropping prices, it is currently built on a linear model which promotes the disposal of garments. The waste created can be attributed to a growing disconnect between people and their clothes, but it is also symptomatic for inefficient design and production methods. However change is possible. Extending the life of garments has been shown to be the most effective means of reducing the impact of the apparel industry in terms of water, carbon and waste footprints. Designing and constructing clothes to achieve this goal has been a core catalyst for Generations.

Creative exploration

Together, Bianca and I explored the creative potential in the concept. Our journey started with the layout of inspirational examples in manmade and natural realms, which then influenced the early design of the garments. These steps were followed by the creation of various prototypes as well as colour and material studies to clarify the final design. We started with the design of the two tops as a way to specify the number and the size of the patterns that would be used for the trousers.

Metamorphosis

Modularity dissociates the patterns from specific body parts and therefore allows them to be used in any way. So by assembling modular pieces with processes that enable deconstruction and reconstruction, the textiles can live longer and in different forms. The major driving force of this approach is to keep apparel out of waste streams and to reduce our dependency on raw materials.

Project in collaboration with Bianca Saunders, work in progress.
2015-2016 | Royal College of Art